Reading the stock – Gardener’s Folklore

One of my New Years resolution, one that I actually stuck to, was to put time aside to actually read more of the books in my stock. After all, the reason I set up the shop was because I loved cooking and gardening (and drinking) and the books on the subjects.

So armed with a glass of wine I sat down to read a likely book, newly in – The Gardener’s Folklore by Margaret Baker. After all this is the time of year when I need all the help I can get in the garden and on the allotment.

One of the exciting things I came across was the Seed Planting Clock sold by W. Atlee Burpee Co of Warminster, Penn in the 1970-80s. What a brilliant thing! Made to show at a glance the time of day, day of the week, month of the year, phase of the moon, days of first and last frost and proper days for planting. I need one of these!

Anyway back to the book.

The author collected and sorted a vast number of old garden beliefs from Britain and North America, from 1973 to 1976 she appealed for instances of gardening traditions and received a raft of letters which she used, along with her research, to look at customs that were still observed and from the past.

The first chapter looks at influences of the moon, sun and stars and reminds us of just how ingrained planting, caring and harvesting has depended on the influences of the moon and sun since man began to practice horticulture. Something that has been lost with our gradual distance from the soil and our connection with where food comes from. Biodynamic horticulture has made a comeback over the past few decades and is now more popular than ever, no surprise as some of us try to reconnect with the earth.

Interesting too are the instances of ‘growing magic’ the next chapter. Some sound quite strange such as ‘whipping  and shooting idle trees’ and some are quite rightly damned to the distance past, I’m talking of sacrifices here! But many of these superstitions have a very practical basis however strange it may seem to us now. As Margaret Baker comments, ‘whipping and shooting trees would undoubtedly knock off surplus fruit spurs and by reducing the number a tree must support, improve the crop’

This is a truly readable and absorbing book. If you are in anyway looking at improving your growing, it wouldn’t hurt to look a little closer at how our forefather (and of course mothers) brought a little magic into the garden or orchard.

I know I will be.

Like this book click here